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Displaying items by tag: gardening how to make simple changes towards an eco-friendly lifestyle? Have you wondered where to buy your organic food and goods locally? Or how to be more energy efficient? Do you know what is recyclable in Belgium? We do - or we know someone who does! This site is intended to be an information rescource and focal point for ecologically minded people living in and around Brussels. Please revisit the site often, because we update it on a regular basis. http://sunbeams.eu Sun, 26 Mar 2017 22:43:58 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Got Compost? http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/186-got-compost? http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/186-got-compost? Got Compost?

My grandmother is the consummate composter. In her home, nothing goes to waste and everything has a latent purpose. Kitchen scraps are certainly no exception. Vegetable trimmings, fruit peels, eggshells and coffee grinds are not waste, but potential fertilizer for her garden. Throwing these kitchen rejects into a bag to put on the street would be the true waste. In this rubbish, she sees opportunity and in her need to reuse, she gets a little creative. Why not give your kitchen scraps a new purpose by finding alternatives to the waste bin? But how do us “city folk” embrace this organic spirit and turn our cuisine by-products into fruitful soil? It is actually quite easy. First, learn this song. Next, let nature lead the way and the microorganisms literally do the dirty work.

 

Before discussing how to compost, let’s first make sure we understand what ‘compost’ is and how it helps us. Compost is simply decomposed material - either plant or animal - that has reclaimed nutrients from the decaying matter. There are two key benefits to composting. The first is a benefit we all share - a reduced amount of waste. Obviously, the more we compost, the less we contribute to the cost of trash removal and the volume of solid materials in landfills - which is the scourge of our landscapes. The second benefit is for your garden, which ultimately contributes to a healthier and more sustainable home. Once you start producing fait maison compost you will increase the potential of your garden (with either the esthetically pleasing variety or the food-producing type) and decrease your reliance on expensive chemical fertilizers. Compost improves soil, which in turn supports healthier and more productive plants by providing essential nutrients for healthy growth. Compost also improves the soil’s structure, making it easier for soil to hold and use the right amount of moisture and air.

Starting the composting process is relatively easy. A day’s work, some Euros and a healthy dose of determination are all you need to get your fertilizer factory up and running! Let’s go through this step-by-step.

  • First, you need to select an outdoor space for your project. Choose a spot with direct exposure to sunlight but which is relatively protected from the elements.
  • Next, build or buy your structure (3x3x3 works best) and lay it on bare earth (this is important because it enables helpful insects to get in and breakdown the ingredients).
  • Finally, decide if you would like to be a passive or active composter. Essentially, this boils down to choosing whether or not you want to intervene with the decomposition process. All living material will eventually breakdown, given enough time, so as a passive composter you are only required to allow nature to take its course.

As an active composter, there are tasks to be done - but there are also faster results. A purposefully managed compost pile will produce fertilizer in about 3-4 weeks, whereas a passive pile generally takes about one year. Decide which method works best for you, but either way, you will reap the benefits of your efforts (more info available here).

Once your compost bin is ready to go and you have decided which type of composter you would like to be, you can begin adding material. Most of what you are going to use to create your planetary soup are material that you would have just originally thrown out (see the chart below), so rest assured this is an easy process. There are a few important tips to keep in mind though:

  • Anything that was once living is great for compost bins
  • Add compost materials in layers, alternating brown and green (see chart below)
  • Aerate regularly to increase the speed at which your compost is composting and decrease the smell (probably beneficial for both the active or the passive type)

 

Browns (materials that are rich in carbon)

 

 

Greens (materials that are rich in nitrogen)

 

Bread and grains

Fruit and vegetable scraps

Corncobs

Coffee grounds AND filters

Dried flowers

Tea bags

Egg shells

Flower bouquets

Fall leaves

Spoiled juice

Food-soiled cardboard (recycle if clean but compost if dirty)

Grass clippings, pruning’s, fresh leaves, weeds

Nutshells

Manure

Old potting soil

Green plants

Pine needles, small twigs, straw and hay

Feathers

Sawdust/wood shavings

Cornstarch and other organic packing material

Shredded newspaper

Brewery waste

Source: http://www.joyblooms.com/gardening/brown-green.htm

Your finished product will be about ½ the size of the original pile and should look, feel and smell like rich dark soil. The final result should not resemble its original form, so if you can still see an apple it’s not ready yet! It is best to add finished compost to your garden about 2-4 weeks before you plant, so right about now, is a good time to start building your bins! Have fun watching nature takes it course and enjoy reaping the benefits of a healthy garden. Happy composting!

This article was originally published in the May 2011 edition of the Sunbeams Newsletter.

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Articles Wed, 18 May 2011 11:28:40 +0000
Sunbeams Sprouting Workshop http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/159-sunbeams-sprouting-workshop http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/159-sunbeams-sprouting-workshop

sprouting2Sunbeams is holding a free 'sprouting' workshop for anyone interested in learning how to sprout their own seeds
and beans for tasty, fresh and nutritious food that is easy to make at home.

Wednesday, 09 February 2011, 09:15 - 10:30

The workshop wil be held at:

Savoorke,
International Montessori School,
Bergestraat 24,
3080 Tervuren

info and registration: info@sunbeams.eu

view all sunbeams events

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Articles Fri, 04 Feb 2011 21:21:00 +0000
Sunbeams Wildlife Sheet - How to Attract Lady Bugs to Your Garden http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/132-sunbeams-wildlife-sheet-how-to-attract-lady-bugs-to-your-garden http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/132-sunbeams-wildlife-sheet-how-to-attract-lady-bugs-to-your-garden Sunbeams Wildlife Sheet - How to Attract Lady Bugs to Your Garden
  • Use a variety of plant species, especially hazelnut, hawthorn, and lime tree (tilia/linde/tilleul) are popular.
  • Do not clean up leaves and stems from your garden until after the winter.
  • Practice eco gardening: no pesticide or insecticides.
  • Do not cut the grass too often and leave it high in some spots.
  • Leave some of the nettles, they love it!
  • Flowers provide them with nectar and pollen.
  • Make a shelter for the winter for them and watch them cuddle up.
  • They are the perfect solution for aphids or plant lice on your roses!
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Articles Thu, 11 Nov 2010 21:23:15 +0000
Tips on Gardening for Wildlife http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/45-tips-on-gardening-for-wildlife http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/45-tips-on-gardening-for-wildlife

This article will give you valuable tips to turn your garden into a paradise for wild plants and animals.

  • Plant indigenous trees, plants, and flowers and find their “wild” versions. Choose a large variety to attract many species. Plant bushes for small birds to hide from predators and preferably bushes with berries. Do not trim the bushes between March and July when birds are breeding;
  • Opt for a green fence: plant bushes rather than a fence around the garden or let ivy grow on the fence or other hedging plants to grow around the fence. It is a sanctuary for birds and butterflies to take cover. Leave an opening at the bottom of the hedge/fence for small animals like hedgehogs to pass through;
  • Leave piles of fallen leaves, stones, branches, trunks of wood as shelters for small animals and insects. Leave the fallen fruit for butterflies and other insects. Do not keep a too tidy garden;
  • Try to reuse all garden “waste” in your own garden (composting, grass mulching, make wood chips for mulching);
  • Leave an area in your garden to grow wild and add wild flowers for insects and birds. Many butterflies need wild host plants (e.g. nettle) to feed their caterpillars and bees love wild flowers. A mixture of wild flowers can even grow on a balcony!
  • Practice eco-gardening: no synthetic pesticides, insecticides, or fertilizers! Find alternatives instead: go for homemade mixtures, eco-friendly products or attract natural “pest controllers” like hedgehogs (slugs) and ladybugs (aphids) to your garden;
  • Make a natural pond or provide clean water or chopped ice in winter time;
  • Collect rainwater and use it to water your garden;
  • Try to avoid motorized tools;
  • Provide shelters and feeders for birds, squirrels, hedgehogs, and even butterflies, solitary bees and ladybugs.
  • Enjoy observing the activity in your garden or balcony!

We invite you to have a look at related articles such as the ones on eco-gardening and biodiversity. A comprehensive list with translations of plant names is available here.

This article was originally published in the November 2011 issue of the Sunbeams newsletter.

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Articles Thu, 25 Mar 2010 13:44:09 +0000
The Herb Spiral http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/39-the-herb-spiral http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/39-the-herb-spiral
herbspiral
Photo: anarchitect

One of the best quick garden projects we can all undertake near our homes is building an herb spiral. The idea is pretty straight forward: a spiral, one to two meters in diameter, curving and rising to a center point about a meter high allows us to put as many herbs as possible in as small a space as possible. The walls are made of stone, the inside is a series of different planting materials.

The spiral comes from the world of permaculture and the general principle is that by creating a rising spiral we can create a series of microclimates which then favor different species of plants – and thus we can grow all the herbs we need for cooking within just a few meters of our kitchen door and have fresh spices all year round. If a plant prefers direct sunlight, it will be on the south-facing side; if it needs shade, on the north-facing side. Some herbs also prefer rockier, drier soils, and so we fill the top-most section with sandy, almost gravel soils, transitioning gradually to a mixture of sand and potting soil to potting soil to heavily composted potting soil – with even a basin of water at the bottom to let us grow things like watercress which need to be full-time in the water.

By replacing the bricks in the walls in certain places with things like bundles of sticks, we also create habitats for all kinds of beneficial insects –and the basin of water at the bottom can help us shelter frogs and other critters crawling through our backyards looking for a home – not to mention offering a water source for bees, the best of all garden bugs.

How to do it

First, select a good site. The ideal spot is somewhere close to your kitchen (because who wants to run all the way across the yard to cut herbs on a rainy January night?) and yet exposed to direct sunlight for all those sun-hungry Mediterranean herbs. Also, you’ll need a circle of free space, about two meters in diameter.

When you’ve got the right spot, mark the center with a stick, and tie a length of string one meter long around it. Turn the string to mark the boundary of the circle, and then lay a layer of cardboard or old newspaper (no need to buy anything new for this –just make sure you take all plastic off before you lay it down) all along the circle you just marked. This layer will mulch whatever you have lying there underneath (the paper and cardboard will decompose as well) and keep weeds from popping up into your spiral. Ideally also you should have the top of your spiral facing north – it just works out best this way, trust us.

Next, lay out the rocks to form the perimeter, and trace out the form of your spiral. On the outer edges they won’t need to be more than one rock deep, but on the inside you’ll need to build it up higher (remember we’re hoping to get it about one meter high – not a rule, but a nice guideline). Lay gravel (whatever you have on hand – again, no need to buy new stuff for this!) below for drainage, and then lay soil and compost above, gradually increasing the portion of gravel on the surface as you get towards the top. At the bottom, create a little submerged basin for the water – think of it as a little pond.

Water the whole spiral well and let it sit for a brief time and then plant away! Herbs that like drier soils (sage for example) should go on top; herbs that like it wetter (mint –though be careful, it can take over!) should go lower down. In between –well, just pick your favorite spices, find out what kind of climate they like and then stick them in where they belong!

In all, the construction shouldn’t take more than a day – less if you do it with friends and family – and it can really change your entire garden, bringing in a host of new species of plants, insects, and other animals while all the while making your cooking a whole lot better and reducing your carbon footprint (no more imported spices!).

Really, what more could you want from a day’s work outdoors? As the permaculture people say: "All the world’s problems can be solved in a garden."

This article can be found in the March 2010 edition of the Sunbeams Newsletter.

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Articles Wed, 31 Mar 2010 13:33:00 +0000
Getting Started with Eco-Friendly Gardening http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/21-getting-started-with-eco-friendly-gardening http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/21-getting-started-with-eco-friendly-gardening

Spring is in the air and slowly our outdoor work in the garden or on the balcony starts again. How to do it respecting nature, environment and not to forget, ourselves? Here are some ideas to choose from:

Photo by .imelda on flickr!Try to encourage a diversity of species of plants and animals: make hiding places for animals then they will come automatically, check with your local garden centre which plants are local/domestic and which plants attract butterflies, bees and birds (or get some inspiration and order online from e.g. www.vivara.be), maybe even get organic seeds and plants (e.g. www.ecoflora.be);

Have you thought of giving enough space to spontaneous nature? Wild life loves it, and nature often tells you which plants thrive best in your garden! Choose ground covering plants to discourage weed, or have a look at www.cecotec.be to find and order tools to control weed;

Please do not use chemical pesticides, but try to find alternatives: e.g. spray (eco-friendly) dishwashing soap or nettle “tea” (insect pests), and even boiled rhubarb leaves (against slugs) or eco-friendly products like from e.g. EcoStyle (more general info www.pesticides.org);

Also try to avoid chemical fertilisers, and use eco-friendly alternatives: compost (from your own kitchen waste), manure, kelp, bone meal, rock mineral fertilizer, etc.;

Many people choose to get their own free compost with a compost heap, a bin or a wormery (to be found in your local garden centre or e.g. at Nature et Decouvertes shops), Sunbeams will organize an English workshop on composting in May or June (see our Events Calendar for dates and enrolment) and see our article on composting in May 2009;

Try to reduce the use of water e.g. by collecting rainwater to water your garden (to be found in your local Brico, garden centre, Metro or Nature et Decouvertes) – some communes subsidies water collecting systems like e.g. green roof tops - and see our challenge on water usage in June 2009;

Why not go for eco-friendly garden furniture? You can choose wooden garden tables and chairs with FSC labels (now available in many shops, eg Brico and Gamma: a complete list to be found on www.wwf.be ), choose for a natural hedge (bushes or wood) instead of an iron fence (for ideas have a look at e.g. www.castanea.be or send them an email in English on info@castanea.be to find their sales addresses; or check out “Groene Guy” for magical fences, for contact details see our website under Useful Addresses, Garden) and find some lovely garden lights based on solar energy (e.g. Nature et Decouvertes);

There are many eco-friendly tools: choose tools without a motor (or one using little energy!), tools of good quality and take well care of them (you can order tools on-line from e.g. www.vlaamszaadhuis.com or www.cecotec.be or to be bought at your local garden centre), try to share the cost and usage of tools with friends and neighbours;

Maybe you can learn how to do ecological lawn care: buy a bio fork (“woelvork/grelinette”, e.g. Guerliu,) to plough and prepare the soil manually before sewing or use a corer (“verticuteermachine/scarificatrice”) to aerate the soil, use compost and eco-friendly moss products (e.g. EcoStyle, VertiGazon), water correctly, and do not cut the grass too short (+7cm)!  For more info see www.pesticides.org;

And why not eat organic herbs, fruit, and vegetables from your own garden? They could not be more fresh and rewarding to eat! Your children would love to be part of it and if you have a surplus, it can be used as the perfect gift!

See our address section for eco-freindly garden centers and gardners.

For more info: see www.ibgebim.be, www.velt.be, www.vlaco.be , www.ovam.be , www.natuurpunt.be, www.natagora.be

This article can be found in the March 2009 edition of the Sunbeams Newsletter.

 

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Articles Wed, 17 Mar 2010 15:47:33 +0000
Composting http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/19-composting http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/19-composting Composting

 

Compost bin
Compost bin by D. Mitchell on flickr!

Do you have to compost in Belgium? By law the answer is no. However, if you want to reduce your waste removal costs and carbon footprint on the planet, or if you want to create free organic matter or free fertilizer for your terraced or in-ground plants, then your answer is definitely YES!

 

The next question you should answer is “How will I accomplish it?” Most communes collect compostable organic matter between April and November, and then collect Christmas trees in January. Alternatively, you may compost at home regardless of urban, suburban, or rural dwelling or time of year. Whichever route you choose, you can take small steps towards a sustainable solution. The choice to compost at home reduces your carbon footprint one small step further.

The commune

You can choose the commune route. Communes differ in the method they choose for collection of household or garden organic matter. In some communes you need to transport it to a collection site (e.g. a container park), yet others have you collect the waste in green bags (only garden waste) or GFT bins (which stands for Groente-, Fruit-, en Tuinafval, or vegetable, fruit and garden waste. Be aware that there is a list available at your commune on what belongs to these categories and what not). The green bags or GFT bin you purchase yourself and leave at the curbside at the appropriate time. If you live in Brusselsm please check the website of the waste management agency and the Environment Institute for more details.

“Whichever route you choose, you can take small steps toward a sustainable solution”

If you live in the Flanders Region, check www.interrand.be or www.interza.be or do a search by commune on www.fostplus.be. Remember that your commune will only collect organic matter for six months of the year so you must consider how you will dispose of your material for the other half of the year. You could benefit by visiting your commune’s composting site to collect organic matter in your own container for home use (less waste), but there is no guarantee how organic/bio the compost will be.

Two major brand names in Belgium sell organic compost in plastic bags of 20 or 50 kg (DCM and Center Park). Buying compost is a better choice than not composting at all, but making your own has quite some advantages. It is also good to know that some communes provide demonstrations at specific dates, usually at their container park (check the calendar of your commune). At such events, trained compost masters explain how to go about and some of them are even willing to come to your home (check above mentioned websites and search for “compostmeesters”).

Your small steps to composting at home

Choosing to compost at home provides a treasure trove of rewards. Composting at home returns the waste from what you eat or grow at home back to your soil, terrace, or in-house plants without adding to your carbon footprint by transporting it to a different site.

At home, you make black gold when you compost, thus saving you money by eliminating the need to buy organic matter for your plants. Black liquid gold, known as compost tea - collected if you choose to worm compost - again can save you money by reducing your need to purchase man-made fertilizers (organic or synthetically manufactured). Finally, it is an excellent opportunity to teach your children about the cycle for decay of organic matter.

Determining where to set-up your composter

The most desirable location for fast decay will be a sunny spot where the composter will receive water and adequate aeration. That is all it needs: sun, water and air. However, the decay process will occur anywhere (think forests!). There is one exception: a worm bin should be in the shade. Before you buy or make one, check out if your commune sells them and/or gives subsidies for buying a compost bin.

There are different options to set up a composting container. If you have a big garden and quite some grass and leaves, opt for making your own garden heap. On De Groene Klusser's website you might find an original one woven with willow or you can just fix some wooden plates (remember space for the aeration) or even wooden pallets together. Another option is to buy a tumble bin, a plastic cage or a worm bins (e.g. Can o’Worms which you can get at Nature et Decouvertes).

It is best, but not essential, to begin by placing a first layer or nest of sticks/branches to allow for aeration at the bottom of the heap/bin. Make sure you alternate brown matter, like dead organic matter such as leaves from a spring or autumn clean up, with green matter, like fruit or vegetable or grass or green leaves from your garden.

It is important not to add fats or bones to your compost as this will attract animals. Another trick to avoid small rodents in a garden heap or compost heap is to surround it with metal wire (with small holes). Small flies can be avoided by adding a layer of paper on top of your pile. It can help reduce odor by assuring your pile is not too wet and to add some more brown matter. Add water periodically if your heap/bin is not receiving enough water through green matter.

Compost piles can be left to their own life cycle, or aided by stirring periodically, turning once a year, or by the addition of a compost starter. Check the bottom of your pile, tumbler or worm bin regularly to examine the result of your efforts. Have your actions generated black gold for your earth bank?

This article can be found in the April 2009 edition of the Sunbeams Newsletter.

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Articles Wed, 17 Mar 2010 15:44:15 +0000
Biodiversity http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/10-biodiversity http://sunbeams.eu/index.php/information/our-articles/item/10-biodiversity

22 May 2009 was the International Day for Biodiversity. Biodiversity refers to the diversity of all living creatures: the diversity between species, the diversity within the genes of one species, and the diversity of the habitat they live in or their eco-systems.

biodiversity

You have heard about the endangered and extinct species of animals and plants for which mankind often has been responsible. One species disappearing can have a lot of consequences for other species within the same eco-system and once extinct, one cannot restore that imbalance.

In Belgium – this little country – 22.500 different animal species have been registered so far, but more than a third of them are threatened. There are many fragile eco-systems in Belgium and only 1.1 % of the total of surface of Belgium is classified as nature reserve (the most known ones are the Hoge Venen/Hautes Fagnes and ‘t Zwin).

There are many reasons why we all should try to encourage biodiversity: ethical reasons (our duty for the next generations), ecological reasons (to protect the fragile balances to which we ourselves belong as well), economic reasons (we are depend on nature in many areas) and emotional reasons (e.g. to keep the polar bears a bit longer).

But even you can do something for biodiversity! What could you do to improve it? Here are some ideas to choose from:

  1. Make a safe haven for small birds with a natural border of shrubs and bushes. The best is to plant indigenous or domestic ones and for Belgium, ideally this would mean bushes like maple, hawthorn, hazelnut, hornbeam or blackthorn. If you want to check whether a plant is an invasive species threatening Belgian wildlife check this website.
  2. A tidy garden is not what wildlife asks for! Try to leave some piles of cut branches or wood: this is an excellent spot to attract insects and many birds eating them, like robin birds, wrens, and hedgehogs and children will love to join in observing them. If you need to add a metal fence around your garden, please leave some space for hedgehogs to travel in and out! They will free your garden from slugs!
  3. Try to let a corner or area of your garden grow wild. There are many beautiful flowers which attract bees, butterflies and birds and which can make a pretty and busy border (see our information on gardening and translations of plant names).
  4. Plants can even be bought at online nature shops like Vivara; and seed mixtures can be found in many garden centers. Some wild plants are used by butterflies to lay their eggs, e.g. nettle. You could leave one slot of your lawn grow high and only mow it once or twice a year and wild flowers will come up all by themselves! Did you know that 1 million flowers are needed for bees to make 1 kg of honey?
  5. An old wall does not necessarily need to be removed or painted over. Try to maintain it and let a plant grow over it. It is an excellent place for insects like solitary bees to live and hide in. Vivara and Natuurpunt offer insect houses. If you are a little creative, you can make them yourself: Just take a handful of hollow bamboo sticks of 10 cm and tie them together with a strong rope. It's the perfect gift for nature lovers.
  6. Why not make a small natural-looking pond? Find a sunny spot and just start digging up to 80 - 100 cm deep. Make sure you have at least one shallow side with not too steep slopes and local amphibians and beautiful dragonflies will find their way all by themselves into your garden! It is not advisable to catch them from other ponds (and for tadpoles it is even illegal) , because their original habitat might be different and your pond might lack the proper nutrition for this species to thrive. If the habitat is right, they will find it! You can ask your local garden centre for indigenous species of water plants to give your pond the finishing touch.
  7. If you like to observe some of the most active “parents” in the world you can hang up some bird nest houses in your garden (again, check the Natuurpunt and Vivara websites or visit the bird association's website). Make sure the entrance is directed towards the South-East to protect it from wind, rain, and direct sun. Hang it at least 2,5 meters high and not higher than 5 meters and slighted tilted forward in order to keep out rain.
  8. What about planting a domestic tree? It has become a kind of tradition in some parts of Belgium to plant a “birth tree” when a baby is born. If you plant fruit trees, it would be nice to consider choosing “old” species. And please, think twice before you cut a tree in your garden! In Belgium, you need a special permission to cut a tree older than 50 years. Try to give the “annoying” tree another chance for at least a year and see whether you can find a way to live in harmony with it.
  9. Why not consider getting a membership for an organic fruit and vegetable basket service? They usually offer lots of locally grown veggies and fruit, including many kinds and varieties (e.g. “old” varieties of apples and beet root) which are hard to find in supermarkets nowadays. Did you know that 95% of all 500 varieties of cabbages and 500 types of beans have disappeared?
  10. Did you know you can reuse all the natural waste of your garden to make your own garden flourish? Make your own compost and chop all branches, leaves and grass into small pieces with the proper tools!
  11. Try not to use anything ending on “-cide” (like pesticides, insecticides or herbicides) and opt for environment-friendly alternatives (see our article on eco-friendly gardening).
  12. Maybe you can start looking for sustainably caught fish for your dinner at home or in the restaurant (see our information on sustainable fish and translations of fish names).
  13. Please do not buy souvenirs of endangered species (like coral, sea stars, seahorses, tortoise shells), nor exotic pets (like frogs and tortoises), or exotic wood (ask for the FSC label for sustainable wood and wooden furniture).
  14. Consider helping to protect a nature reserve in Belgium.
  15. Last but not least, please respect and enjoy nature and live as eco-friendly as you can!

For more information about biodiversity in general, check the FAO background document on biodiversity. To learn more about biodiversity in Belgium refer to these websites: www.biodiversity.be, www.naturalsciences.be (both available in English), www.vips.biodiv.be, www.ibgebim.be, and www.natuurpunt.be/biodiversiteit (in Dutch and French only); www.bombylius.be (for kids, Dutch and French).

Finally, for some amazing pictures we refer you to National Geographic.

This article was published by Sunbeams in the June 2009 issue of its newsletter.

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Articles Wed, 17 Mar 2010 14:21:38 +0000